An appeal

I am going a bit off the beaten track this time. But I hope you will indulge me and follow.

One of my earliest blogs (Him and Her) was about feeling invisible in later years and the importance of still valuing oneself. It was perhaps easy for me to suggest that even though I am fully aware of the difficulty of implementing it and feeling that worth as so often our self-esteem is dependent on others and can thus be so easily eroded.

Lately I have been thinking a lot about this as I have been in close contact with elderly people who not only feel helpless and worthless but also very lonely even though they have family because no one seems to have time for them.

The common thread that comes up in talking to them is the dire need for human contact, I would imagine both emotionally and physically. Researchers have found that loneliness is just asย lethalย as smoking 15 cigarettes per day. Lonely people are 50% more likely to die prematurely than those with healthy social relationships.

Recently, I was standing in a queue at a supermarket and the lady behind me, who only had a couple of items, was asked if she would like to go the self-service line as it would be quicker. She declined and turned round to explain to me that she came everyday just to buy one or two things so that she could talk to someone and we struck up a short conversation till it was my turn.

So I decided to make an appeal in my blog this time (even though it might be a bit presumptuous of me) and reach out to my dear readers to request them to phone an elderly relative, neighbour or friend, that they know or maybe even make time and visit.  

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42 thoughts on “An appeal

    1. Yes indeed. We need to take better care of each other. I think we can all start by acknowledging instead of ignoring the other. And sometimes a nod, a smile, is all it takes. Lovely post ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I am proud to say I have many friends in their 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and even 90’s and I always feel like I might go and cheer them up but they end up cheering me up… many are not well or homebound… but they love to just talk and laugh and you can learn a lot from them… I always come away with a little gem

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That’s great, a lot of times we push away the elderly and forget about them. It’s nice to know that you spend time with them. They can teach us a lot and like you said sometimes it’s good for us too.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. We need to take better care of each other. Sometimes just a smile and a small gesture to the other is enough. We ALL need to feel acknowledged. To feel invisible is an awful thing….

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for this blog! So true, elderly people are too often ignored and discarded it is sad!! I watched a movie yesterday on Netflix called “Old People” and though the movie was an “extreme” fiction, it is real, and it hit right at the nerve of how we treat older people and the feelings of neglect and uselessness they must feel. Had me thinking!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful post yes loneliness is very tough for us so you are right if we do call those elderly people who are lonely it will be greatเฅค๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿ‘Œ Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This post was meant for me! Iโ€™ve been debating about some things but you have just helped me make my decision. Thank you for writing this. ๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฝ

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thank for you for this post, and I completely relate to this. My elderly relatives live alone, and is also surprising how less stimulating conversation is via mobile home and messenger. It can be a particularly isolating world. Reaching out like you have done is such a precious thing to do for the whole community here.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I read about the problem of loneliness, the utter sense of uselessness too. It’s the fault of the fragmentation of the family and busy times. We should make time for our loved ones who have been there for us when we were in need.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. In today’s world, communication is the key. We have such less social meetings that it results in isolation. It affects the youth and elderly so much. It’s really important to have conversations and talk and have fun because we have a life so why not live it?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I oftentimes feel ignored and overlooked even at 66 and stay home way too much due to still working from home at the computer. I do have a few neighbors I could spark up a Friday night ‘card night’ or game night of some kind and I think I might just do that!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I know this to be very true. I’m 73 myself but I visit two elderly seniors, one 89, one 94, who need attention and help at times. I get lonely too and it helps me to help them!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This is so important, thank you for this ๐Ÿ™ I’ve been working at a nursing home for most of my life and have seen how much it means for the old people living there to have their relatives and friends visit them. And, when they get to meet animals it’s also makes them extremely happy. I’ve seen people cry when they get to pet a dog once again. And now, when my aunt lives at a nursing home I make sure I visit her now and again. You don’t have to stay long a short visit will do. So once again, thank you !

    Liked by 1 person

      1. And also, I like older people because they are great and can offer so much in return since they lived longer and have more life experience. So it’s not like your just doing them a favour, you learn a lot too!

        Liked by 1 person

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